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Any Charges Reported on this blog are Merely Accusations and the Defendants are Presumed Innocent Unless and Until Proven Guilty, through the courts.

September 30, 2008

Aged Care: Select Committee Recommended Changes (New Zealand)

Select committee recommends changes to aged-care
NZPA
September 29 2008

Parliament's health select committee has made a range of recommendations about funding the aged-care workforce and improving quality of care.

The committee considered a petition organised by the New Zealand Nurses Organisation and Service and Food Workers Union and signed by close to 34,000 people.

The unions wanted fair pay for workers comparable to counterparts in public hospitals, adequate staffing levels and funding for appropriate training.

The committee recommended

Abridged
SOURCE : National Business Review
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Proper Aged Care policies and funding are vital to prevention of Elder Abuse.

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1 comment:

John Coxon said...

Legislation, or action by police, under existing legislation, to charge those that abuse elders with a serious offence will help - but only after the fact. Very few people that commit a crime actually think of the consequences. It is possible some people choose not to commit a crime because they are aware of the consequences, however legislation will not prevent elder abuse from occuring.

The key to eliminating elder abuse lies with a combination of quality monitoring, incident monitoring and staff training.

Staff need to be trained to spot signs of abuse. Processes need to be in place to report suspected incidents - without fear of retribution.

Elder abuse is a symptom of mismanagement. It occurs due to poor employee selection, poor supervision, poor training and a complete lack of respect and care for another person.

Creating a good workplace, where people treat each other with respect, costs money. This is something the sector is short off. Yet it remains a problem of management - develop the processes to provide high quality residential care within the financial constraints for get out of aged care and do something else.

It is not reasonable to expect residents to suffer the conseqences of poor management.

John Coxon
www.johncoxon.co.nz

DISCLAIMER

Any Charges Reported on this blog are Merely Accusations and the Defendants are Presumed Innocent Unless and Until Proven Guilty.

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